Articles Directory
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A Short History of Haymaking

Haymaking has been a chore for the farmer almost as long as there have been farmers. And while today’s modern machinery and weather prognostication allows for much simpler and faster haymaking, that wasn’t always the case.

In the 17th and 18th centuries, haymaking was a very cumbersome task with little output because the act of actually harvesting the hay was a process that relied solely on the hands of the farmer, or, if lucky, crude tools. Eventually, seeds were introduced from abroad that allowed hay to be made in greater quantities.

Around the year 1790, hay production finally saw a major spike due to the introduction of new machinery that was created during the Industrial Revolution. The main innovation that helped the hay business was the wooden rake. Now haymaking was not reliant on hands.

By the mid-19th century, seeding tools and cutting tools gained popularity. On top of this, animals were introduced to help transport haymakers about their fields. This was doubly important to the creation of hay. First, it allowed large expanses of land to be cleared for hay, and, secondly, it made laying hay seeds a less cumbersome task. Haymaking, though still a strenuous activity, was no longer so inefficient. Around this time, alfafa hay saw a rise in popularity—a popularity that still exists today.

Further industrial advances—namely the tractor—helped further streamline the haymaking process. Animals had run their course, and, though they were useful in the fields, vehicular transportation proved more advantageous. The tractor allowed for more ground to be covered and thus more hay to be cultivated. With this, hay became more and more profitable. The tractor’s valuableness increased when gasoline-powered engines came about.

The progression of haymaking has occurred rapidly. The growth was initially minimal, leaving haymaking as an undesirable and low-return endeavor. However, as soon as this advancement picked up speed, it never looked back. What was once an occupation that consisted of using hands and primitive (by today’s standards) tools has evolved significantly over the course of two centuries. Haymaking has changed completely thanks to once unfathomable technologies, for example, the tractor. These technologies have made haymaking profitable and much less labor-intensive. This evolution can be credited chiefly to the strength of the human spirit and its ability to revolutionize tasks of all kinds. Haymaking is no exception.

Posted By: The Hay Manager

Posted on: 07/20/2015
SHARE THIS:
 
B2B Vibe 2012 © Privacy policy. All rights reserved.