Articles Directory
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Avoiding Hay Fires

A hay fire is a disaster that no one wants to encounter. Hay fires can injure or kill livestock, destroy buildings and other farming supplies and are a huge financial burden. The best way to prevent these headaches is to take steps to avoid hay fires. The prospect of a hay fire may be intimidating, but stopping them from happening in the first place is a fairly easy task.

The primary cause of hay fires is hay that is too moist. This might seem to be the opposite of what one expects, but it is due to the fact that moist hay attracts microorganisms. These microorganisms, once they have begun to inhabit the hay and start to reproduce, generate heat, which serves as the catalyst for destructive hay fires. Hay is most susceptible to lighting ablaze within a month to a month and a half after bailing. However, hay of any age can catch fire—even if it is indeed less likely. Even if hay does not light on fire, this heating can damage hay to the point where it cannot be used for livestock feed, making the hay a sunk cost.

Given the problems associated with hay fires—or even heat-damaged hay—it is necessary to take precautions to keep hay cool enough. Before bailing, one should be careful in how the hay is cured. Depending on how it is cured—for example, with an acidic preservative—the hay should have different levels of moisture. When curing hay, one should be conscious of the weather. It is best that hay be cured with low humidity—never greater than 50 percent—and when there is some wind. In addition, certain preservatives can help speed up the drying process, which will prevent large amounts of microorganisms from making their homes on the hay.

Even after hay has been cured and bailed, be careful not to store it in places where it could get too wet. Make sure there are no leaks in wherever it is being stored.

And while moisture is a major cause of hay fires, other influences can cause big trouble. One should be sure to not place hay near any electrified surfaces. In addition, one should be cautious about having open flames near hay—perhaps even avoiding doing so altogether.

Hay fires are dangerous and financially burdensome. However, if one takes the proper steps to keep hay dry and keep it away from other sources of ignition, the problem disappears almost immediately.

 

Posted By: The Hay Manager

Posted on: 06/09/2017
SHARE THIS:
 
B2B Vibe 2012 © Privacy policy. All rights reserved.